Political Dresser

Genius Idea: Cancel Gone With the Wind

Genius Idea: Cancel Gone With the Wind

Since our PD Book Club pick for the this month is To Kill a Mocking Bird, our staff felt that we...

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EU: Greek Yogurt Can Only Be Greek

In the off chance you were lamenting last year’s Brexit Vote, just know that Britain’s leaving in...

With Love From Bulgaria

With Love From Bulgaria

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India and Carrying Gold

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Memory Lane Monday: Davutoglu and Daash

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Since last year’s attempted “coup” Erdogan has been the strongman on everyone’s mind when it...

September’s Book: 1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue

Language is a beautiful thing.A peek into the historical context of words and phrases soon to be banned.This time for the PD Book Club Pick, with the word police on high we thought we’d go with a dictionary--- an idea that also works if you were feeling a little down at this scholastic time of year, since you’re one of the few not going for your second or third Master’s Degrees.

The concept for the 1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue (now available for free on Kindle) by Francis Grose, was originally published in 1785 covering popular slang from the time, and subsequently revised/reprinted over the years by fans of the original work, which takes us to this the Second Edition.Snatch it up now for free on Kindle.

Since it is a dictionary, your eyes most likely will gloss over every few pages or so, which is why we recommend tackling the 248 pages a letter at time, or alternatively you can turn it into a word of the day calendar.

Pick up your copy here or from our side margin, and leave your favorite word or phrase you come across down in the comments. 

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  • Guest (Valerie)

    At least back then there weren't as much abbreviations : ttly, Omg, asap, lol...

    0 Like
  • Guest (Calle)

    I'm slowly reading through this one and it is pretty interesting. There are a lot of phrases that still work now, but I didn't know the history behind them.

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  • Guest (Pague)

    All Nations---a drink of mixed leftover alcohol. Love it.

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